Wall Paper – Artdeko BG http://artdeko-bg.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 01:56:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://artdeko-bg.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/artdeko-bg-icon-150x150.jpg Wall Paper – Artdeko BG http://artdeko-bg.com/ 32 32 My miscarriage felt like an abortion. Today, I would be a suspect. https://artdeko-bg.com/my-miscarriage-felt-like-an-abortion-today-i-would-be-a-suspect/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:09:00 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/my-miscarriage-felt-like-an-abortion-today-i-would-be-a-suspect/ Placeholder while loading article actions What does a miscarriage look like? What does an abortion look like? What secrets are known only to a woman and her toilet? Apologies to the disgusted, but let me tell you the story of a miscarriage – how much like an abortion it can be. And how dangerous both […]]]>
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What does a miscarriage look like? What does an abortion look like? What secrets are known only to a woman and her toilet? Apologies to the disgusted, but let me tell you the story of a miscarriage – how much like an abortion it can be. And how dangerous both can be when a woman does not have safe access to medical care.

I sat in my sunny bathroom above the urine-soaked toilet and stared at the object in my right hand in denial. It couldn’t happen. It was going to ruin my life. Or at least the short-term plans I had made for it.

You’d be forgiven if you think I’m describing the day I found out I had an unwanted pregnancy. I’m not. In the same place, about two months earlier, I had been overjoyed when I peed on a stick and got a positive pregnancy test. That is why, this afternoon, what I was holding filled me with horror.

There was blood on the toilet paper.

I called my husband in a panic. I called my doctor in even greater panic. She assured me it was probably nothing. I had had an ultrasound two days earlier and everything seemed perfect. My husband and I had been dizzy at the sight of the little fetus dancing on the screen. And we were reassured by the conventional wisdom that a good ultrasound after 10 weeks is almost as good as holding a baby, since the risk of losing a pregnancy drops to single digits once you’ve passed that milestone.

But as the day progressed, things got worse. At bedtime, I had cramps and clots. We called the doctor again. The nurse on duty told us the best we could do was go to the emergency room.

The moment we arrived, I knew in my heart that my pregnancy was over. As we walked through the sliding doors, I pulled my baseball cap over my eyes to hide my tears from the room full of strangers and walked towards the screening counter. I leaned forward and said in a flat, hoarse whisper, barely holding back the sobs, “I think I’m having a miscarriage.”

Unfortunately for everyone that night, at the same time, a pedestrian who had been hit by a truck arrived in the ER, and we were sent to the orange plastic chairs to wait. Realizing the woman sounded like she was going to live, I angrily told my husband that I hated her for cutting the line. (Please consider: I didn’t really mean it and I wasn’t at my best.) The moment they called my name, I felt like a clawed beast had firmly grabbed my belly and pulled it down to the ground. . And just as I stood up, I felt a sudden spurt and watched in terror as the blood soaked into my jeans from my hips to my knees.

I remember the next half hour in a series of nightmarish clips. The nurse pushed me into the room and closed the door as I screamed and strangers gaped. My husband helped her pull my blood soaked jeans off my legs as they laid me down on the exam table. The doctor rushed in and said she couldn’t diagnose a miscarriage until they found a fetus outside my body. The nurse and doctor were snooping around the blood clots surrounding me on the bed until I heard the nurse say quietly, “I found it.” The doctor holding a small pink drop the size of half my little finger and dropping it into a plastic cup.

For most women, what comes next is you clean up, get dressed, and go home to settle your grief. But my miscarriage was not typical. When we got to the cleaning and dressing part, I found that I was so soaked in blood that the hospital rags they gave me were totally useless. As soon as I wiped away the blood, more took its place. And it kept happening. We called the nurse back. She glanced at the bed, left the room, and quickly returned with the doctor. I was having an incomplete miscarriage, bleeding uncontrollably.

The doctor ordered emergency dilation and curettage, or D&C, a cleaning procedure that is essentially the same as an abortion. On the way to the operating room, I continued to bleed so profusely that the preoperative nurses could not even discern my external anatomy. The surgeon discovered that a significant amount of tissue had not detached from my uterine wall, hence the bleeding. She removed it, the bleeding stopped and I was cleared to go home and mourn.

In a frustrating epilogue, the doctors were never able to determine why my miscarriage happened. Against all medical probability, my healthy pregnancy simply failed. Sometimes, even in our age of modern medicine, these things happen without any evidence of what went wrong.

This story has become a sad and long buried chapter in my life. I had three healthy babies. But since the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe vs. Wade was leaked, making real the possibility of fetal assault laws being applied to women presenting to the ER with symptoms of miscarriage, I was troubled by a chilling thought: If I had the same miscarriage today in the wrong part of the United States today – or if I was poor or a woman of color – would I be suspected of terminating my own pregnancy?

Like many women in Texas, I had a safe and legal abortion. What happened to our condition?

The fact is, no one can distinguish a medical abortion (one performed with prescription drugs) from many types of miscarriage. Both typically present with increasing bleeding, cramping, and eventual passage of the products of conception. Currently, there is no empirical way to tell whether an expelled pregnancy was medically induced or an unfortunate coincidence. All doctors need to do is take the patient’s medical history and the story she tells them herself.

To date, at least half a dozen states either ban self-directed abortion or do not exempt pregnant women from prosecution under fetal injury laws. These laws, enacted with the aim of bringing justice to women who lose sought pregnancies because they are victims of violence, could be perverted to make women themselves criminals instead.

What would the facts of my miscarriage look like to a not-so-biased stranger? Would the triage nurse see my eyes hidden in my baseball cap as a sign of desperation or deviousness? My hoarse whisper like someone trying to keep his composure or his defiant brutality? Would the staff view my complaints about the traffic accident victim as exactly the kind of selfish coldness that someone indifferent to the health of her pregnancy would show? How about the perfect ultrasound a few days earlier? Or the fact that the first time a medical professional saw me, I was already covered in blood? Or the later medical reports that found no clear reason for my pregnancy loss?

My doctor would surely support me, I thought. But then I remembered that I left that maternity ward because they could never keep their patients straight. Nobody ever knew me or why I was there. They were so overworked that the official cause of my first miscarriage (it was my second) was still listed as unknown because someone forgot to update my file. So, to a detached observer, it would appear that I had two pregnancies that suddenly ended under similar circumstances. If they looked at my work history, they would also see that I had received a promotion that year. And if they talked to people at a meeting I attended shortly before I got pregnant, they would say that I said loudly, drunk, and repeatedly that having children in this moment would be a disaster for me.

Would all this be enough to arouse suspicion?

I can’t begin to describe what the days after a miscarriage are like for a couple who desperately wanted that baby. It is abject mourning. It’s a roaring hell of pain and lost dreams. Imagine having to prove to the law that you didn’t do this to yourself while your ears are still ringing from the explosion. At a time when a woman needs compassion the most, to treat her as a suspect would be inhumane.

I am worried for American women when I consider the complications I had from my miscarriage. In rare circumstances, a woman undergoing a medical abortion could experience the same complications. I needed immediate medical help, and so did she. But would she be too afraid of getting in trouble to go to the hospital?

This is how women bleed to death on their bathroom floors.

Today, I am as amazed as most of the world that America has taken this giant leap backwards. Women should not be put in the position of advocating for the things their bodies do naturally or fearing to seek that care because their reproductive decisions began outside of current restrictions. Some things should stay between a woman, her doctor and her toilet.

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The Johnsons ‘wanted their wallpaper donor to fund a £150,000 treehouse’ https://artdeko-bg.com/the-johnsons-wanted-their-wallpaper-donor-to-fund-a-150000-treehouse/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 08:41:09 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/the-johnsons-wanted-their-wallpaper-donor-to-fund-a-150000-treehouse/ If you have a donor who is willing to pay £840 per roll of wallpaper, surely it’s worth asking for a £150,000 bulletproof treehouse for your child, isn’t it ? It appears that is what really happened as the Prime Minister allegedly planned to build a very expensive treehouse in Checkers Park using funds provided […]]]>

If you have a donor who is willing to pay £840 per roll of wallpaper, surely it’s worth asking for a £150,000 bulletproof treehouse for your child, isn’t it ?

It appears that is what really happened as the Prime Minister allegedly planned to build a very expensive treehouse in Checkers Park using funds provided to him by a Tory donor who, by coincidentally, also gained access to lucrative government contracts. contracts in the past.

According to reports in the Time, Still alive at the time of writing, Lord Brownlow was set to raise the money to build the project in autumn 2020 for Boris and Carrie’s son Wilf.

The design was to include bulletproof glass, but the couple decided not to proceed with construction after advice from the police.

None of the 10 helpers raised concerns about the cost of the project and that it would have cost more than buying a house in many parts of the country. “He was told it would look terrible,” a government source said.

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So how was this news passed on to the humble taxpayers?

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Also, this answer from Kristie Allsopp was kind of funny…

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Related: The Tories actually won the by-election… according to the Prime Minister’s sister

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Wallpaper Market Outlook 2022 and Growth by Top Key Players – Arte-International, Artshow Wallpaper, Asheu, Balibz – Designer Women https://artdeko-bg.com/wallpaper-market-outlook-2022-and-growth-by-top-key-players-arte-international-artshow-wallpaper-asheu-balibz-designer-women/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 17:29:31 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/wallpaper-market-outlook-2022-and-growth-by-top-key-players-arte-international-artshow-wallpaper-asheu-balibz-designer-women/ Wallpaper market A study by “Verified Market Reports” provides details on market dynamics affecting the Wallpaper market, market scope, market segmentation, and overlays on major market players, highlighting the favorable competitive landscape and trends that have prevailed over the years. This Wallpape Market report provides details about recent new developments, trade regulations, import-export analysis, production […]]]>

Wallpaper market A study by “Verified Market Reports” provides details on market dynamics affecting the Wallpaper market, market scope, market segmentation, and overlays on major market players, highlighting the favorable competitive landscape and trends that have prevailed over the years.

This Wallpape Market report provides details about recent new developments, trade regulations, import-export analysis, production analysis, value chain optimization, market share, impact of national and localized market players, analyzes opportunities in terms of emerging revenue pockets, changes in market regulations, strategic market growth analysis, market size, category market growth, application niches and domains, product approvals, product launches, geographic expansions, technological innovations in the market. For more market insights on the Data Bridge Market Research Wallpape, please contact us for an analyst briefing,

Get a sample copy (including full TOC, charts and tables) of this report @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/download-sample/?rid=105756

The analysis and estimates made through Wallpape’s exceptional report helps to get an idea of ​​product launches, future products, joint ventures, marketing strategy, developments, mergers and acquisitions and their effects on sales , marketing, promotions, revenue value, import, export and CAGR. With the latest and up-to-date market information mentioned in the report, companies can think about how to improve their marketing, promotion and sales strategies. Business reporting helps determine and optimize each stage of the business process lifecycle, which includes engagement, acquisition, retention, and monetization. The Wallpaper Market Research Report

Key Wallpaper Market Players Are:

  • Art International
  • Art Exhibition Wallpaper
  • Asheu
  • balibz
  • Mayakprint Llc
  • Art LLC
  • Elisium
  • Erismann
  • Kof Palitra
  • japanese wall

Global Wallpaper Market Segmentation:

Global Wallpaper Market Segment By Type:

  • Wrapping paper
  • Coated wallpaper
  • Embossed wallpaper

Global Wallpaper Market Segment By Application:

  • Household paper
  • Commercial space
  • Administrative space
  • entertainment area

Regional Wallpape Market Analysis can be represented as follows:

This part of the report assesses key regional and country-level markets on the basis of market size by type and application, key players, and market forecast.

Based on geography, the global market of, Wallpape has been segmented as follows:

    • North America includes the United States, Canada and Mexico
    • Europe includes Germany, France, UK, Italy, Spain
    • South America includes Colombia, Argentina, Nigeria and Chile
    • Asia Pacific includes Japan, China, Korea, India, Saudi Arabia and Southeast Asia

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Scope of the Wallpaper Market Report

ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
CUSTOMIZATION SCOPE Free report customization (equivalent to up to 4 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.


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June 23, 2022 | Nevada Public Radio https://artdeko-bg.com/june-23-2022-nevada-public-radio/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:54:41 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/june-23-2022-nevada-public-radio/ What first attracted you to cinema?I think maybe the Muppets in the mid 70’s. I was obsessed with the Muppets and tried to make my own Muppets as a kid. And of course star wars blew me away, like so many people. I actually had a book of The puppet movie. I would be obsessed […]]]>

What first attracted you to cinema?
I think maybe the Muppets in the mid 70’s. I was obsessed with the Muppets and tried to make my own Muppets as a kid. And of course star wars blew me away, like so many people. I actually had a book of The puppet movie. I would be obsessed with set details and miniature things. Then I bought a video camera around 1980 and started with models, making spaceships and landing them on pieces of foam with talcum powder. I grew up in Bahrain, in the Middle East, and we had very different copyright laws. So the way we looked at media in the 70s in Bahrain was you go to the video store, and you get 30 or 40 or 50 videos in a milk crate, bring them home, bring them back the next month . At a very young age, I just had a million movies at my fingertips that I watched. And that was Bahrain, which is a lot like Vegas, so when I was a kid it was too hot to go play outside, so I stayed inside and watched movies.it’s all day.

What was the inspiration for Don’t move me from the mountain?
No idea. I woke up one morning in February last year and had the film’s protagonist, title, and basic premise in my head. I’m like a creative supernova. I can not help myself. I can just be creative on tap in many different mediums and formats. I always was. I can just turn it off and on at will. All my life I’ve often wondered, will this creativity ever run out? One day will I turn on the tap and nothing comes out? But it still is.

Did you plan to make your first feature film, or was it born out of this particular idea?
It was kind of a few little things. I went to CSN in 2014 and got four (student) Emmys while I was at CSN in the film program. I thought, okay, this kickstarts my film career. So I dropped out of school, expecting the doors of Hollywood to open, and they didn’t. I spent the next few years honing myself, learning my craft as a freelancer and getting better and better as a filmmaker. I was always telling people, “Yeah, I’m a director,” because I’ve done nine shorts, I’ve done 100 TV commercials, I’ve had four Emmys, I’ve gotten loads of awards. And I was like, I feel a little silly, because I tell people I’m a director, but I actually haven’t directed a feature film. So in 2020, I was just like, next year, I just have to get there. Whatever it takes.

What was your strategy to raise funds for this film?
I did it the traditional way. I took to the streets and talked to people and asked people. It was the hardest thing I have ever done in my life. It was excruciating, painful and difficult. I was in different stages of this process with about 200 people for months. It was brutal. In the end, worse than that, industry pros called me and told me why I shouldn’t do this and why it wouldn’t work. It was really discouraging. I cried a lot and stressed a lot, but I kept persevering and succeeded.

What kind of research did you do?
Because the central subject of this film deals with the homeless and the problem of homelessness in modern America, I wanted to approach the subject with authenticity and dignity. My producer Patrick Wirtz and I contacted Las Vegas Rescue Mission, and they were all about the project. They very graciously arranged interviews which we did with half a dozen people who were not hosted and are now hosted. Similarly, Shine a Light Foundation also took me to the tunnels of Las Vegas. It is by interviewing these people at the shelter that many of the film’s micro-stories, their experiences, were born. I’m really glad we were able to do this, because it added a real layer of authenticity.

How was the experience of filming in the underground tunnels?
Creepy. It was all kinds of trouble. For starters, you can’t get a permit to cut down there, because it’s a storm sewer, so it could flood at any time. So, first of all, we’re shooting guerrilla style. Then when you’re there, nothing that relies on Bluetooth or Wi-Fi works. Things like cameras talking to remote monitors and stuff like that. There were technical problems. And then there are only logistical problems. If I need to use the restroom, it’s a long walk, then a drive to the store, then back.

We chose tunnels on the outskirts of town, where when we spotted them they were uninhabited or lightly inhabited. When we went to shoot, there was one particular day when, at the other end of the tunnel, there was a resident who very clearly didn’t want us and was shouting abuse at us in the dark, and knocking a metal pipe against a metal something. We were terrified. He started a fire to try and smoke us out, and the Henderson fire department had to come down and flood the tunnel. We had to get all our gear out. We had to do the takes between him, yelling at us. We were kind of timing when he was out of breath, and then I was going, “Action!”

What do you hope audiences will take away from watching this film?
I would like to draw attention to the plight of homelessness in America. I hope when people watch it, not only are they entertained, but I hope they see Vegas in a new light. Because no movie has ever shown Vegas like this movie. Compared to like Ocean’s Eleven and Casino, in our film, we use every bit of the buffalo – the mountains, the desert, Summerlin, downtown, in the skyscrapers and CityCenter, under the tunnels, under Caesars. So I’m excited for people to see that, and so is a long-time, proud resident of Vegas.

Of course, I want them to take away the reality of homelessness. The reality is that people are homeless for a multitude of reasons. It’s not always just drugs and alcohol. It’s everything from mental instability to the main character in our movie, she’s actually willfully homeless because she’s punishing herself in penance for what she’s done in the past. And we met people like that during our research.

What does it mean to you to receive this award from the Nevada Women’s Film Festival?
It’s incredibly humiliating. It is very rewarding. I have been working freelance for 10 years, 15 years as an editor. I’ve done shorts over the years, and I’ve had shorts at festivals. Honestly, it comes so much from left field. Never in a million years would I have guessed that they would grant me this honor. It’s very, very nice. To go through this process of making movies and choosing this career path, and still being dedicated to art and craft, I had to make so many personal sacrifices. I had to go without so many things, whether it was personal care or sometimes even food, because I invested that money in the next camera or accessories or whatever I did. I have always had to make huge sacrifices for my art. I don’t really know why I do it. I’m just driven to do it. Any kind of recognition is always a real sense of relief that someone saw what I do.

What are you going to work on next?
It’s crazy, because we are already in full pre-production, and we start production in a few weeks. Stanley Kubrick once said, “You don’t choose your films; your films choose you. And it’s so true. I always said I would never do a documentary, and then this opportunity came to me to do a documentary, and it was just such a great opportunity that I couldn’t look away. The movie is called The shaken and shaken, and this is the story of flair bartending. Vegas is the flair bartending capital of the world, and I was a flair bartender a very long time ago, and I still have deep roots in that community. And we are also developing the film after that. It’s called My Own Private Nazi, and it’s a thriller set in Utah in 1981. I’ve always said I’m a writer in training. I don’t think I’ve done the same genre twice.

Nevada Women’s Film Festival. June 23-26, MEET Las Vegas, 233 S. 4th St. $10 per screening, $30 pass. nwffest.com

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Inhabit Queen’s Gardens Sustainable Hotel Design https://artdeko-bg.com/inhabit-queens-gardens-sustainable-hotel-design/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 06:24:52 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/inhabit-queens-gardens-sustainable-hotel-design/ Sustainable hotel design championed at Inhabit Queen’s Gardens Inhabit Queen’s Gardens, the newly opened hotel destination in west London, is a sustainable hotel designed by architects Holland Harvey Probably the most sustainable thing to do for the planet is to avoid a lot of travel; but if travel seems inevitable, planning a trip in the […]]]>

Sustainable hotel design championed at Inhabit Queen’s Gardens

Inhabit Queen’s Gardens, the newly opened hotel destination in west London, is a sustainable hotel designed by architects Holland Harvey

Probably the most sustainable thing to do for the planet is to avoid a lot of travel; but if travel seems inevitable, planning a trip in the most eco-friendly way is definitely the way to go. If you’re bound for London, the Inhabit family’s newest offering, the chain’s Queen’s Gardens location, might be just the ticket. The recently opened Inhabit Queen’s Gardens, designed by Holland Harvey Architects, is a project designed using the key principles of sustainable hotel design – without compromising comfort or style. In fact, its sustainable architecture is so ingrained in its making that it’s something you don’t even notice on a visit – natural materials aside.

For the architecture studio behind it, led by Richard Holland and Jonathan Harvey, this wasn’t the first foray into hotel design – they were also behind Inhabit’s other London location, in Paddington. But this is the first time they’ve been able to take their sustainability ambitions to this level, working with the overall more environmentally friendly approach of restoration and redesign (as opposed to building new) .

The design reuses a crescent of Grade II listed mid-19th century Victorian townhouses, delicately transforming them into a haven of urban calm. Public areas on the ground floor include a cafe, restaurant, and lounge, as well as a library and meeting rooms, which can be reserved for hotel guests and the general public. Wellness spaces, including a spa, exercise and yoga rooms, occupy the fully refreshed basement, which was once a dark, poorly ventilated restaurant.

The property’s sustainable hotel design credentials are impressive, covering the fact that just under 100% of construction waste was diverted from landfills through recycling initiatives or reused, in elements such as the custom Granby Rock terrazzo used on the fireplace (by Granby Atelier); the use of environmentally friendly surfaces and materials such as carefully selected wood, Richlite paper-based fiber composite and cork; and a focus on locally sourced furniture, including items created by social enterprise Goldfinger.

Changes in materials and floor treatments subtly delineate different functions in common areas where appropriate, while smartly designed and styled interiors in off-white and green tones, and warm, natural woods ensure that spaces – like the 70-seat restaurant – feel cozy and intimate.

“Celebrating and showcasing the existing heritage building and keeping sustainability at the heart of the project inspired subtle but deliberate architectural moves. This careful approach to design brought the concept of the new Inhabit hotel to life. Working alongside a creative and collaborative team with a diverse skill set and a clear view of the client naturally resulted in a building that felt like a home away from home. The final project is not just a hotel with comfortable rooms, but a gift of a new space for the whole neighborhood and Inhabit customers to enjoy,” says Maria Gutierrez, senior architect at Holland Harvey, who worked on the project. §

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Cannes Lions 2022: How McDonald’s went from just a “wallpaper brand” | Advertising https://artdeko-bg.com/cannes-lions-2022-how-mcdonalds-went-from-just-a-wallpaper-brand-advertising/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 17:37:20 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/cannes-lions-2022-how-mcdonalds-went-from-just-a-wallpaper-brand-advertising/ On day one of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, Morgan Flatley, Global CMO, McDonald’s and Neal Arthur, Global CEO, Wieden+Kennedy, explained how the brand plans to revamp its communications strategy in 2019. The conference was moderated by Jeff Beer, editor of Fast Company. Beer said he perceived McDonald’s not to be the most […]]]>

On day one of the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, Morgan Flatley, Global CMO, McDonald’s and Neal Arthur, Global CEO, Wieden+Kennedy, explained how the brand plans to revamp its communications strategy in 2019.

The conference was moderated by Jeff Beer, editor of Fast Company.

Beer said he perceived McDonald’s not to be the most creative marketing brand, even though it was a big spender.

Flatley agreed with his perception and said that when she became global marketing director in 2019, her stated goal was to change it.

“We were kind of like wallpaper, because we were everywhere but didn’t make sense to customers. McDonald’s is a large-scale organization and we serve 40 million customers a day. We didn’t want to disrupt the operational machine that we were. But we realized that when you talk to everyone, you end up talking to nobody, at least in the United States,” she said.

She added that McDonald’s wanted to make sure the brand meant something to people by making the brand more meaningful and connecting emotionally with consumers.

Arthur went on to describe Wieden + Kennedy’s speech to the brand, which he admitted was a disaster at first.

That changed after the agency held a roadshow to find out what people thought of the brand.

“We thought brand-wide and wanted to do something huge, but we struggled at first. Then we did a roadshow to find out what people thought of brands. It changed the things for us. People had stories about McDonald’s and we wanted to be a real person and speak to our consumers,” he explained.

Flatley added that the difficult conversations the brand and the agency had together at the start helped as the relationship progressed.

She explains: “Initially, we thought that W+K didn’t know the brand and didn’t like it! But the magic is that when they did the road trip, they got to know our consumers. We got to know the enemies and the business problems we had to solve.

Arthur said that while McDonald’s knows the haters and the business issues it needs to address, brands should focus on the consumers who love them.

“With any big brand, there’s a tendency to see hate comments on YouTube, but then you can ignore the consumers who like you. Focus on those consumers and why they like you. On this journey nine-month pitch, we built that trust with McDonald’s. Once we built that trust that allowed us to take more risks with things like Travis,” he said.

On the campaign, Flatley added: “I was confident on the outside but called Neal late at night to be sure. It helps to have that confidence. What helped tremendously was that it was created during Covid, when there was so much uncertainty, so there was a willingness to try stuff and take risks,” she said. declared.

Work with celebrities

Explaining why the agency wanted to work with celebrities, Arthur said, “We wanted to engage with them in a way that felt authentic. Travis had ideas from the jump. His talks on the goods were with conviction. So we created a space for him to work. It was precious. It became the basis of what we did with other celebrities. BTS did it too – they put it in their language and also co-wrote it.

Flatley added: “We’ve been very rigorous with our dealings with celebrities and asked them what their ‘order to follow’ is. If they don’t, we don’t associate with them. All of them had interesting obsessions about how they played with food. It was a partnership with a celebrity who loved our brand.

Shortly after the reconciliation, during Scott’s concert, there was a tragedy that left eight people dead.

On whether such tragedies have an impact on the brand, Arthur said: “As an agency, as we also work with Nike and ESPN, we don’t see celebrities being synonymous with brands. We tap into authentic relationships with brands. There will be times when there are negative media cycles. As long as there’s a genuine relationship, it’s fine.

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Discover Matylda Krzykowski’s show, Marsèll Paradise Milan https://artdeko-bg.com/discover-matylda-krzykowskis-show-marsell-paradise-milan/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 04:19:44 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/discover-matylda-krzykowskis-show-marsell-paradise-milan/ ‘You don’t want space; you want to fill it’: Milan exhibition Debuting during Milan Design Week 2022 at Marsèll Paradise, a new exhibition by Matylda Krzykowski explores how we approach the space we live in (until July 15, 2022) A large blue-toned sign, resembling a giant cartoon bubble straight out of a comic strip, welcomed […]]]>

‘You don’t want space; you want to fill it’: Milan exhibition

Debuting during Milan Design Week 2022 at Marsèll Paradise, a new exhibition by Matylda Krzykowski explores how we approach the space we live in (until July 15, 2022)

A large blue-toned sign, resembling a giant cartoon bubble straight out of a comic strip, welcomed visitors via Privata Rezia 2, where a thin neon sign prefigures Marsèll Paradise, the brand’s multidisciplinary Milanese space of Venetian shoes Marsèll. During Milan Design Week 2022, the brand unveiled Matylda Krzykowski’s latest site-specific project (to be discovered at Marsèll Paradise until July 15, 2022).

Matylda Krzykowski at Marsèll Paradise

Installation view of ‘Alcôve’ by Matylda Krzykowski, with artwork by Miriam Wierzchoslawska

Born in Poland but raised in Germany, the artist teaches, plans, designs and writes about physical and digital space.

His most recent project, an investigation into the perception of space in contemporary culture, is also the first to occupy the entire surface of Marsèll Paradise: “You don’t want space; you want to fill it’, is an exhibition, an installation and a social space.

Installation view of ‘Bedroom’ by Matylda Krzykowski

Careful planning seems to call into question, or at least challenge, the precise method of displaying the Milan Design Days. According to the exhibition guide, works by contemporary and transdisciplinary artists, designers, performers and musicians who oscillate between the visual and the performative, the natural and the artificial, the human and the animal, touch and sound are included. Phillip Schueller, Collo Awata & Delfiné, Lisa Ertel & Jannis Zell, and Mirka Laura Severa, with help from Miriam Wierzchoslawska, are involved.

As soon as you enter, a sort of piñata filled with confetti in the shape of a work by Dalí awaits you on the right, suspended from a blue rope – the color blue dominating the whole environment. A painted pigeon peeks over a trompe l’oeil bookcase, long hands with raised fingers roam the rooms, stacks of blue pizza boxes lined with the exhibition title appear in angles, and a neon and transparent curtain reproduces a lobster and a cloakroom at the same time.

Installation view of ‘Dancefloor and Changing Room’ by Matylda Krzykowski with works by Collo Awata & Delfiné and Philipp Schueller

Some furniture comes directly from Krzykowski’s house. A young girl sits on a blue bench at the side of a room called “Alcove,” surrounded by organically shaped spikes in gray, beige, and black, looking at the plans for the exhibit. Two friends take a selfie in front of a pair of cartoon eyes. A video by Mirka Laura Severa is topped with a cartoon speech bubble that reads: ‘There is an audience’s voyeuristic desire to enter people’s homes and living rooms.’ A loft hosts a large blue upholstered bed resting on a green floor, surrounded by stacks of books and magazines – a copy of Liliana Barchiesi’s photography book Give è bello is left open, next to the imprint of a body on the bedspread, indicating the last visitor.

Installation view of ‘Cabin’, featuring artwork by Lisa Ertel and Jannis Zell

Downstairs, in the space usually reserved for exhibitions, the scenography changes radically; a yellow light dominates everything, and the only link to the upper floor is a blue comic that says: “Do you want to live in a tree, or behind a window across the street?” Lisa Ertel and Jannis Zell, designers and artists, seem to have collected non-human artifacts, or biofacts, during their recurring walks through urban and rural landscapes, and brought them back to their studio to create a growing Wunderkammer, mixing collected memories and raw materials. materials with the interior of the workshop, questioning our habitat. ‘Defensive Shelf’ is a spiked metal shelf that accommodates wood and flowers in one corner. ‘Beaver and its Shadow’ is a reproduction of an orange fruit resting on a trunk section.

‘Can I touch it?’ a young man whispers to his girlfriend, as she cautiously sits on a large, dark sofa that seems carved out of stone. It turns out to be soft and comfortable: “I’m not sure,” she replies. “Nothing here is as it appears.” §

Installation view of ‘Cave’, featuring artwork by Philipp Schueller

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Best Outdoor Kitchens for Cooking and Entertaining in the Summer https://artdeko-bg.com/best-outdoor-kitchens-for-cooking-and-entertaining-in-the-summer/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:26:35 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/best-outdoor-kitchens-for-cooking-and-entertaining-in-the-summer/ Heatwave dinner: outdoor kitchens for the summer season The impending heatwave has us scouting for the best outdoor kitchens to bring our culinary prowess outside this summer season. Whether you’re planning your next lunch in the sun or a moonlit dinner, these outdoor kitchens are the perfect place to prepare, cook and enjoy a meal […]]]>

Heatwave dinner: outdoor kitchens for the summer season

The impending heatwave has us scouting for the best outdoor kitchens to bring our culinary prowess outside this summer season.

Whether you’re planning your next lunch in the sun or a moonlit dinner, these outdoor kitchens are the perfect place to prepare, cook and enjoy a meal or an appetizer during the warm season. These outdoor kitchens reinvent gardens and terraces as an extension of our homes, bringing the party outside with a plethora of innovative solutions, cutting-edge materials and designer compositions to suit any space. .

Outdoor kitchens: wallpaper* edit

OiSide modular outdoor kitchens

The outdoor furniture company OiSide presents OiCook, a modular collection of outdoor kitchens inspired by traditional indoor models, with an aluminum structure and a selection of four porcelain worktops. The collection includes an integrated fridge, cooker and sink, and its four different models can be combined in a myriad of compositions, both wall-hung and free-standing with a cantilevered bar-style worktop.

oside.com

Cube modular outdoor kitchen by Luca Nichetto for Brown Jordan

Stainless steel outdoor living specialists Brown Jordan Outdoor Kitchens collaborated with designer Luca Nichetto on a new modular kitchen concept, unveiled during New York Design Week 2022. The kitchen modules feature sharply drawn contours and a distinctive range of bold hues. Contrasting colors, including on surfaces resembling wooden slats, create a modern juxtaposition in individual rooms.

brownjordanoutdoorkitchens.com

Rock.Air by Steininger

This outdoor kitchen is made up of individual and modular kitchen cubes that can be combined offering different functionalities: gas barbecue or lava grill, sink and dishwasher, fridge/freezer element with ice maker, storage space and burner can be mixed and matched as needed. space needs. The sculptural kitchen is made of powder coated steel and glass, with the most practical details concealed within the modules for a clean, minimalist visual result.

Modular outdoor kitchen Adapt by Vlaze

Isle of Wight-based enamel specialist Vlaze has launched the Adapt outdoor kitchen collection, aimed at outdoor entertaining and featuring modular units clad in the brand’s signature materials. Free-standing and on wheels, Adapt outdoor kitchens can be configured to suit different cooking and entertaining styles, from beverage carts and prep areas to pizza ovens to barbecue grills, with a larger module imagined for group receptions.

Norma outdoor kitchen by Rodolfo Dordoni for Roda

The “Norma” outdoor kitchen by Rodolfo Dordoni for Roda, developed in collaboration with Italian appliance manufacturer Ilve, is a modular system consisting of two freestanding modules – one with an extendable table – with stone tops Sintered lapitec. It is so elegant that we could also have one for indoors.

rodaonline.com

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Mid-Century Modernist Tropical House in South Jakarta https://artdeko-bg.com/mid-century-modernist-tropical-house-in-south-jakarta/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 04:13:10 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/mid-century-modernist-tropical-house-in-south-jakarta/ The Tropical House is Inspired by Mid-Century Modernism in South Jakarta Dhsac Residence by Bitte Design Studio is a tropical home in South Jakarta, with distinct mid-century influences This generous tropical home in South Jakarta by Bitte Design Studio merges the classic elegance of mid-century modernism with the expansive openings and wide, long roofs of […]]]>

The Tropical House is Inspired by Mid-Century Modernism in South Jakarta

Dhsac Residence by Bitte Design Studio is a tropical home in South Jakarta, with distinct mid-century influences

This generous tropical home in South Jakarta by Bitte Design Studio merges the classic elegance of mid-century modernism with the expansive openings and wide, long roofs of traditional architecture in its climate zone. The Dhsac residence, a new private house, consists of two elements arranged at 90 degrees to each other; a brick box on the ground floor and a first floor protected by louvers and slats, all under a low-pitched roof.

The house favors the texture of materials, from patterned brick to the rhythm of slatted panelling, with large openings that open the ground floor onto the garden while remaining sheltered from tropical rains by the overhanging roof. .

The entrance is a tall, wide doorway set below the overhanging first floor, with a double carport forming a cave-like niche within the monolithic brick structure. This space is effectively the “front of the house”, containing utility areas, a powder room and an office, with a path leading across a linear pond into the main living space.

These rooms have higher ceilings and a lighter material palette. The open-plan space contains the kitchen, dining room and living room, all of which can be opened onto a large terrace overlooking the garden through a large sliding glass door.

The master bedroom is also on this level, a generous suite with its own dressing room and terrace. The master bath, hidden behind sliding doors, is defined by its long stone sink and another sliding door opening to a private plunge pool in the lush courtyard.

The main staircase is open and is under a large skylight. Below is a reflecting pool that creates an undulating light that reflects off the white walls.

Upstairs there is a gallery landing above the double height living room, with space for an office area overlooking the garden. Two en-suite bedrooms and a large roof terrace are also found on this level, with the glass-walled bedrooms hidden by a wall of vertical louvers.

Simple geometric patterns join the rich natural materiality. The ceilings are covered with thin wooden slats, while two walls of the double-height seating area are lined with square shelves.

These modules are carried upstairs to form shades for the balcony above. Voids also help airflow, while the wide roof shields occupants from direct sunlight.

Fixtures and accessories are a mix of key classics, including Eames lounge chairs, dining chairs by Marcel Breuer, lamps by Louis Poulsen, stools by Arne Jacobsen, and an Isamu Noguchi coffee table.

Lighting and accessories from Bitte’s own collections are also integrated into the design.

Bitte Design Studio was created in 2012 by Chrisye Octaviani, Agatha Carolina and Seno Widyantoro. The studio has won numerous awards and specializes in hospitality design, often creating a project’s furniture and interior fittings as well as the architecture.

The Dhsac Residence is a deft update of the materiality and richness of mid-century design, using light, protection and careful planting to create a series of strikingly intimate spaces. §

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The Salone Satellite is back: here are the highlights of 2022 https://artdeko-bg.com/the-salone-satellite-is-back-here-are-the-highlights-of-2022/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 05:11:52 +0000 https://artdeko-bg.com/the-salone-satellite-is-back-here-are-the-highlights-of-2022/ The Salone Satellite 2022, on the theme “Designing for our Future Selves / Designing for Our Tomorrows”, takes place in halls 1 to 3 of Rho Fiera, in the grandiose setting of the Salone del Mobile 2022. At the heart of the exhibition ” design under 35″, 600 emerging creatives reflect on the world that […]]]>

The Salone Satellite 2022, on the theme “Designing for our Future Selves / Designing for Our Tomorrows”, takes place in halls 1 to 3 of Rho Fiera, in the grandiose setting of the Salone del Mobile 2022. At the heart of the exhibition ” design under 35″, 600 emerging creatives reflect on the world that will be and the role objects will play in life to come – they also see the Salone Satellite as a key platform for gaining recognition from an international audience, as well a bridge between creativity and business.

Salone Satellite 2022: rethinking design for the future

“I am incredibly happy because all my children have done very well,” exclaims Marva Griffin Wilshire, the soul and curator of the event, which also presented the Salone Satellite Award, now in its 11th edition. . “As you can see, creativity is everywhere, as well as innovation. For example, the word sustainability is so trendy now, yet I’ve seen the issue of sustainability for so many years on Satellite. The jury, led by Paola Antonelli, selected three projects (plus special mentions) that “stand out for the message they embody, focusing not only on the formal incisiveness of their design, but also on their enduring element , communicative, interactive and playful, essential for the lives of adults and children now and, hopefully, also in the future”.

Salone Satellite Award: Winners and other highlights

‘RemX’ by Lani Adeoye, winner of the Salone Satellite Award

Lani Adeoye won the top prize with ‘RemX’, a refined walker prototype made from a combination of natural materials used for many decades in Nigeria by the Yoruba, a tribe of which Adeoye is a member: ‘It is a piece that is meant to help us rethink how we design [for the] elderly people or people who need help walking,” she explains. ‘It’s inspired by [my] grandfather, who was fundamentally embarrassed by the medical products we [gave] for him, because they look very clinical. That’s why materiality was important to me; I wanted to design something that didn’t look medical, something aesthetically thin, functional and durable, so you don’t have to use it but enjoy it in your environment.

The second prize was awarded to Studio Gilles Werbrouck (from the Belgium is Design collective), for the ‘Lamp’ project. The studio produced a limited run of lamps, made by pouring white plaster over black VHS tape, to create a crocheted lampshade and simplified plaster cylinder. Gilles Werbrouck explains: “We decided to use Jesmonite because it is a material that hardens very quickly, which allows us to completely merge the videotape in the same part, to obtain a different texture. Each of the lamps represents a different film: “That’s why some are bigger than others. My favorite? ‘Jurassic Park III’, which is also one of the greatest.’

Lamp by Studio Gilles, second prize at the Salone Satellite Award

Serbian designer Djurdja Garčević (from Young Balkan Designers) won the third prize with her project “Meenghe”: “It is part of a family of urban furniture such as stools, trash cans and flowerpots, which are made from shredded car tires in glue. ‘, explains Garčević. “Everyone buys cars and there’s so much trash, so it’s a way to put those tires back on the street and use a material that doesn’t really have much to do with it. Also, for half my life, I’ve seen people burn those tires in New Belgrade; it smells catastrophically, and it’s toxic. This furniture is just shredded tires stuck together.

As for special mentions? “One of the most important things to me is color; I chose yellow because I like products that are full of energy,” says Emanuele Ferraro, director of Munich design studio Atelier Ferraro, standing next to a light-up, Special Mention-winning chair. “I was trying to create an object that could accompany us in different parts of our lives, because it can be a children’s chair, a lounge chair, a coffee table or even a lounge chair . The chair is called ‘+1.5 Celsius’, a reference to climate change, ‘because I wanted to use materials already produced, reusing old furniture to make new ones’, adds the designer.

Djurdja Garcevic

Another mention was awarded to the “Ease” chair designed by Rasmus Palmgren, qualified as an ode to simplicity by the jury: “The “Ease” chair reconciles material, comfort and aesthetics. Strong but light, comfortable and stackable. The structure is its main design feature, engendering a character of its own. Everyday design seems to be at the heart of young people’s thoughts, along with the desire to respond to the mandate of sustainability and the needs of the most vulnerable in society. For example, “No-More-Less”, a project by Francesco Feltrin and Francisco Rojas Miranda, is a chair made of durable solid oak and wool or cotton, with a user-friendly seat, which can be adjusted to three heights and three different angles.

Among the 600 young designers from 48 different nations, Cyprus, Congo, Cuba, Nigeria and Qatar are taking part in the Salone Satellite for the first time. Design Week Lagos, which promotes contemporary African design as an instrument of cultural and economic renaissance, is present with three pieces, among them fascinating Ethiopian headrests by young designer Abreham: “We want to change the narrative, we are not designers Africans, we are creators who happen to be from Africa,” they explain.

There is broad, in-depth and widespread research into local origins, rites, materials and craftsmanship: Vako Darjania of US-based Vako Design uses his hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia as his source of inspiration for “Rituals”, a collection of candlesticks influenced by the ritual of lighting a candle in a religious way. Andreína Raventós Arquitectura, based in Spain, presents the “Piaroa” collection of easy-to-assemble tables and chairs inspired by the eponymous Venezuelan indigenous tribe, a tribute to the architect’s ancestors. Farzin Adenwalla of Bombay Atelier has created special aluminum tables, “Kulfi”, with terrazzo tops that reproduce the motif of the flavored Indian dessert. §

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